By Ben Feuer, photo by Caleb Roenigk

Here we are again – at the high tide of anxiety for students on the verge of a law school application. A plunge into the unknown, safety-net-less; nothing but their wits and a dog-eared copy of the U.S. News Rankings to guide them.  But this year, one additional choice will await at least some of these future legal eagles; the choice between the LSAT and the GRE.

One thing you learn pretty fast while working (as I do) as an educational consultant is that one of your most important jobs is to dispel fear, ignorance and anxiety surrounding that bugbear that is America’s school application process. And boy, has there been a lot of FUD coming off the latest decision from HLS; allowing either test on their application.

For instance, a certain famous newspaper with a pretty strong anti-law-school bent is now dropping opinion-hints that maybe, just maybe, expanding access is a Bad Thing™.  Their argument (advanced by a late-night TV writer, speaking of absurdly pie-in-the-sky career choices) seems to be that expanding the pool of applicants will simply create more lousy, unmotivated lawyers.  Well, first of all, no, it won’t – the number of seats at any given law school won’t change. It’s possible the move might save a few lousy law schools from the scrap heap, but, if you haven’t figured out by now that any legal education outside the top 100 is a complete crap shoot, caveat emptor. Law school is a big purchase, and you should do your homework before slapping down the cash. This website’s a good place to start.

But more to the point, adding the GRE will actually give prospective students more options, not less. They’ll be able to choose not just between law schools, but between law schools and other degrees, applying to two or three types of program in one application cycle.  Then, once they know where they’ve been accepted, they can make a smart, well-thought-out choice between 2 or 3 very specific options. In the current model, it’s law school or bust, and that’s scaring away people I know who could be great lawyers, but aren’t able to devote a year of specialized education simply to the prospect of being one.

It allows schools to be more selective, weeding out low LSAT types with a low probability of success at law school and instead admitting high-GRE students with great natural ability and intellect.

It also saves students money – the great thing about the GRE is that it’s pretty comparable to the SAT in terms of subject matter and style, so you don’t have to re-learn how to test take all over again. And the fact is, logic games notwithstanding, there really isn’t anything about law school that requires highly specialized or technical knowledge before applying – after all, in many countries, law is an undergraduate degree. It’s a generalist degree. Many JDs don’t actually go on to practice law. And that’s OK too.

It limits the absurdly over-inflated power of standardized tests, which is a good thing no matter how you slice it. The fact that some schools have started to use these numbers as a crutch or a shorthand to save themselves the trouble of holistically evaluating every candidate is unfair and wasteful. Knowing how to game a test – any test, logic games and time restrictions or no – can only be one small slice of judging a student’s readiness to practice law.

As for the bogeyman fear that you might put a lot of effort into something only to find you don’t like it – that’s life! You try things and you learn. Liking the LSAT is not the same as liking Law School. Liking Law School is not the same as liking a law firm. Liking a law firm is not the same thing as liking the law. You have to find what you like. That’s the whole point of our big, unwieldy, messed up educational system.

There are no easy choices in admissions, for schools or students. But there are fair ones. Schools owe it to themselves to expand and not limit access, to make applying easier and better understood, not harder and more exclusive. And that has nothing to do with what kind of student ought to apply, and everything to do with the kind of student we ought to want.