Article by David Thomas, photo by wonderferret

For a couple of years now, GMAC has given students the option to cancel their scores if they aren't happy with how they performed. But control without judgment is a dangerous drug. One question we get all the time at Forster-Thomas is whether to keep or cancel a GMAT score. Although every case is different, here are a few basic guidelines to consider.

When to Cancel. This should go without saying, but if your score is way low, if you were sick or hung over or outrageously distracted, cancel the score. You're all but guaranteed to do better next time.

When to Keep. This category is larger than most people think. You should definitely keep any score that is higher than your previous overall scores, even if quant is lower. You should definitely keep a score with a higher quant score, even if the overall is lower. You should definitely keep a first score within 100 points of your practice tests. You should definitely keep any score of 710 or higher. And you should definitely keep anything with a quant score of 47 or higher.

Why? Say, for argument's sake, you have two tests. One with an overall high score, and a second with a high quant score but mediocre overall. You can refer to that high quant score in an optional essay as additional evidence of how quantitatively brilliant you are -- and schools will factor that in!

Don't panic! Remember -- even if you do cancel a score, you can get it back later. You have 60 days to decide whether to reinstate the scores—for a fee of 100 US Dollars. If you're thinking about reinstating, if you have questions about how your practice tests are going, or you just want to get a better handle on the process -- contact us! We'll be happy to help.