Well, here you are again, Last Minute Larry. You can't claim innocence -- as usual, you did it to yourself. The deadline you've been dreading is now staring you in the face, and it ain't pretty. On the contrary, it's terrifying. And that big blank white computer screen isn't going to fill itself with words. So what do you do?

Whether you've got a week, a day, or only an hour, here's a simple plan to help you make the most of the time you have left and put your best foot forward.

STEP ONE -- FORGIVE AND FORGET. Yes, you are a bad, bad boy or girl or genderfluid person. Naughty, no biscuit. But forget that noise, because the cycle of self-recrimination and avoidance is what got you here in the first place. You need to forgive yourself for the past, and forget everything but what's in front of you right now. Write it down so you won't forget. X minutes to midnight. Time to get serious.

STEP TWO -- SHUT OUT DISTRACTIONS. I know, I know, you're busy like Lady GaGa. You got so much going on right now it's not even funny. Well you know what would be really funny?  You missing that deadline and having to explain to your parents why you're not going to college/grad school this year. I'd enjoy being a fly on the wall for that conversation, because yes, I'm jaded like that. So lock the door, kick out your cat, shut down your Insta feed and get to work already.

STEP THREE -- WRITE VERY BADLY. Yes, you're a brilliant, clever perfect person who must always and forever be admired. But forget that salient fact for just a minute. Because right at this moment, "you" are a space where some words should be. And it's time to fill that space with words. And no, they're not going to be the best words. In fact, they might be some of the worst words. But that's OK. Because you have to start somewhere, which is exactly what you've failed to do up until this point.

STEP FOUR -- FINISH WITHOUT SELF-CRITIQUE. Write the whole thing, right now, don't stop, don't think, just write.

STEP FIVE -- SHUT DOWN AND WALK AWAY. Go have fun, have a snack. Now, if the worst happens, you can hit submit. Even though you probably wouldn't want to.

STEP SIX -- COME BACK FRESH AND IMPROVE. Come back when you're refreshed and read your bad words. Now it is OK to be a judge, but try to come with solutions, not problems. Say -- I think I could tweak this. I think I can punch up that. Not -- I hate myself and this is so bad.

STEP SEVEN -- FIRE AND FORGET. OK, you've revised, it's 10 minutes to the deadline. Time to send it off and forget about it. I know, now that it's been rattling around in your brain because of how long you spent NOT doing it, that might be tough. But just remember you did the best job YOU were capable of doing AT THIS TIME. And that's always enough. Next time, perhaps, you'll be better. Or maybe you'll be worse.

Good luck!

PS: If you procrastinate and you know it -- maybe get some professional help with that.


Photo by Dinesh Raj Goomani




Often, people are surprised when we suggest they write about their Greek experience in a graduate school admissions essay. After all, they reason, there's nothing academically impressive about kegstands and hazing rituals, is there?

Well, if you're letting Animal House cliches blind you to the wide range of fraternity experiences, maybe it's time you re-examined the role of Greek life on a modern campus. Aside from their social functions, fraternities and sororities also do charity work, balance budgets, provide professional training, create and host events and elect leaders, fundraise and recruit. The leadership and organizational challenges encompassed in actually running the day-to-day business of a fraternity is not all that different from running a law office, medical office or managing a division of a business. You need to be persuasive, persistent, innovative and able to work with a wide range of personalities and ideas.

As you already know -- because as a fraternity brother or sorority sister, particularly if you assumed any kind of leadership role, you have been responsible for many or all of these challenges.

Now, do you see how this might become MBA, JD or even MD application essay material?

No one is saying that acting as the social chair of a fraternity is a comparable level of responsibility to, say, CFOing a company. But most twenty-two to twenty-seven-year-olds applying to graduate school haven't been given much professional responsibility yet. Rather than writing about being a tiny cog in a big machine, filing away papers and earning somebody else lots of money, write about the personal challenges involved in persuading alumni to donate $100,000 to keep the lights on, or getting fifteen to twenty people to agree on the theme for an event. Admissions officers will learn a lot more about you that way.

In no way are we endorsing the idea that you should ignore your professional experience when applying for a professional degree!  But you might need to supplement your professional experience with other areas of your life where you had more authority, and fraternities are a great one to consider.
If you're interested in learning more about possible topics and how to write amazing essays, give us a call, we'll be happy to walk you through the process in detail.