Guest Post by Maria Ahmed, Editor at BusinessBecause.com

As the business world grows ever more connected internationally, the new, global version of the MBA is gaining popularity.

These are typically part-time MBA programs, delivered through a mixture of online learning with classmates spread out across nearly every time zone, and regular residencies in different cities around the world where you meet face-to-face.

If you want to embark on one of these programs, you’ll need to show evidence that you're an internationally-minded candidate with a thirst for discovering the world!

The key attraction of these programs is the network you’ll build. Since they’re mostly part-time, your classmates are working and can give you immediate introductions, all-important insider gossip, and hiring information from their employers.

The team at the Duke Cross Continent MBA describe it as an opportunity to build a “culturally-diverse peer network across the globe.” Duke’s Cross Continent MBA is delivered over 16 months in Dubai, New Delhi, St. Petersburg, Shanghai/Kunshan, and Fuqua’s home campus in Durham, North Carolina.

Duke University is something of a pioneer among US institutions in its global coverage, but several European and Asian business schools offer similar programs, for example:

Chinese University Hong Kong partners with four business schools worldwide and its OneMBA takes students to Hong Kong, São Paulo, Rotterdam, Monterrey (Mexico) and Chapel Hill (North Carolina)

The Manchester Business School Global MBA takes place in Manchester, Dubai, Singapore, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Miami and Sao Paulo.

Bradford University School of Management offers an EMBA that is delivered in the UK, Dubai and Manila, the Philippines.

So, if you’re applying to one of these programs, how can you show that you’re the type of person who would thrive, and also bring value to the class?

  1. Highlight your travels, whether for work, vacation or something in between like a gap year spent working and backpacking. In particular, highlight any internships, exchanges or voluntary work you have done abroad. It shows that you can handle diverse work environments and want to do more than lie on the beach.
  2. List your languages, even if you’re not fluent. Explain when and why you picked them up. Even if you learned basic Thai on your gap year travels, it shows you’re willing to make the effort.
  3. Include examples from your professional life. If you’ve ever worked abroad or worked with team members in different countries, explain what the project was, your role in it, and the outcome. Show that you’re aware of both the challenges and opportunities that the globalized workplace offers.
  4. If you’re active on LinkedIn or Twitter or have a blog, connect to people and groups worldwide and interact with them through your questions, comments, and posts. You’ll demonstrate that you can find common ground and build relationships with people from very different cultures than your own.
  5. Show that you’re a connector. Give examples of occasions when you’ve used your personal or professional network to connect people successfully, whether in your own country or abroad. Much of the appeal of a global MBA is in the class members themselves. Business schools want to see that you’ll bring value to the class.
  6. Give examples from around the world. When you’re writing about a company you find interesting or would like to work for, or a business leader who inspires you, draw examples from around the world, not just your own country or the US. Check out the European, Asian and Americas editions of the Wall Street Journal for exhaustive reporting on business, finance and movers and shakers in those regions.

About the author: Maria Ahmed is Editor at BusinessBecause.com – a professional network for business students that helps you make connections before, during and after your MBA. On BusinessBecause you’ll find useful information on MBA rankingsMBA jobs, MBA distance learning, and fresh daily editorial such as the Why MBA series.