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School Nickname: P&S

Median MCAT: 36

Median GPA: 3.79

Associate Dean: Stephen Nicholas, MD

Dr. Nicholas is a pioneer in the care of HIV-infected children and an advocate for the medically underserved. In Harlem, Washington Heights, and the Dominican Republic, where his work has primarily taken place over the past 25 years, he has created innovative community-based educational experiences for medical and public health students and resident physicians. He was director of pediatrics at Harlem Hospital Center from 2000 to 2006, during which time he started the Harlem Children's Zone Asthma Initiative, funded by the Robin Hood Foundation.

Letter from the Dean: Highlights below

One of the most distinctive features of our medical school is the P&S Club, the most comprehensive student activities organization in American medical education.

New York City is a big draw for our students, and so is the vibrant neighborhood of Washington Heights, where P&S is located.

 

 

Top Residencies: 
anesthesiology orthopaedic surgery
emergency medicine pediatrics

Application: More here

Two-stage.  First stage MUST be done through AMCAS, with a deadline of October 15th.  There is then a secondary application for P&S with a deadline of November 15th.

It is rare that we admit individuals from foreign universities because the Admissions Committee does not have satisfactory means of evaluating premedical educaiton at universities outside of the United States and Canada.

Required Courses --

  • At least three full academic years at an accredited college in the U.S. or Canada
  • One year of English
  • One year of Biology with labs
  • One year of Physics with labs
  • Two years of Chemistry, one of which must be Organic Chemistry, both with labs
Applicants may apply if they lack one or two of the above prerequisites, but completion of these courses is a requirement for enrollment. 

A final grade lower than C minus in any required courses is not regarded by the Committee as satisfactory completion of our requirements.

Previous Year P&S Questions:

1. Please describe your parents' occupations: (250 char.)

2. If your first and last name is often mispronounced, how do you pronounce it? (250 char.)

3. Have you previously applied to P&S? (Yes/No)

If yes, briefly summarize your activities since your previous application:

This is an important field for reapplicants -- be sure and affirm that you have grown since your previous application, and use specific incidents and examples to talk about how you have grown.  Even small experiences can carry big lessons with them, so don't feel constrained just because it's been a relatively short period of time since you last applied.

4. If you took time off from your undergraduate studies, please briefly summarize your reasons for doing so. (250 words)

5. In what collegiate extracurriculars did you engage? (250 words)

6. Did you work for compensation during college during the year or the summer?
YesNo
If so, what did you do? How many hours a week did you work? (250 words)

7. If you have graduated from college, please briefly summarize what you have done in the interim. (300 words)

8. What challenges do you expect to arise from living and working in a complex urban environment? How will you meet them? (250 words)

This is an inversion of a typical "What's great about NYC" question -- simply, put, it's asking if you can handle the city.  Be specific about two concerns you expect to come up, and use examples from your past to illustrate why you'll be able to handle the pressure.

9. Is there anything else you would like us to know? (300 words)

 

 

Dr. Nicholas is a pioneer in the care of HIV-infected children and an advocate for the medically underserved. In Harlem, Washington Heights, and the Dominican Republic, where his work has primarily taken place over the past 25 years, he has created innovative community-based educational experiences for medical and public health students and resident physicians. He was director of pediatrics at Harlem Hospital Center from 2000 to 2006, during which time he started the Harlem Children's Zone Asthma Initiative, funded by the Robin Hood Foundation. - See more at: http://ps.columbia.edu/news/stephen-nicholas-appointed-associate-dean-admissions-0#sthash.NnViFJmr.dpuf
Dr. Nicholas is a pioneer in the care of HIV-infected children and an advocate for the medically underserved. In Harlem, Washington Heights, and the Dominican Republic, where his work has primarily taken place over the past 25 years, he has created innovative community-based educational experiences for medical and public health students and resident physicians. He was director of pediatrics at Harlem Hospital Center from 2000 to 2006, during which time he started the Harlem Children's Zone Asthma Initiative, funded by the Robin Hood Foundation. - See more at: http://ps.columbia.edu/news/stephen-nicholas-appointed-associate-dean-admissions-0#sthash.NnViFJmr.dpuf
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Wednesday, August 06, 2014

Should I get an eMBA?

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The eMBA: prestigious, expensive, polarizing.  Is it worth your time and effort?

 By Ben Feuer

Here at Forster-Thomas we see all kinds of prospective students applying to all kinds of programs, and among them, we see many people applying for an MBA.  And why not?  If you are in your late 20s and looking for a career change or just a bump up the corporate ladder, an MBA can provide you with the contacts and the training you need to succeed.

But what if you're 32, or 37?  What if you have a family?  What if you don't want to leave your job, or your employer offers to sponsor you?  For those as well as many other reasons, some people have lately come out in favor of the eMBA, even as others proclaim its days numbered thanks to the growing popularity of online degrees.  So which is it?

The answer is simple.  It depends.

PROS:

Sponsorship.  If you are in the right company, in the right role, you may be partially or fully sponsored for an eMBA.  Have you already looked into this?

Less rigorous.  Low GMAT?  No problem.  With the eMBA, work experience is what counts, and selectivity is reasonable, with ~50% acceptance rates at top programs.

Keep your job.  Even if you are not sponsored, you can continue to earn a paycheck while you earn your degree.

A better network.  Some claim that the later-career classmates at eMBA programs are more eager to learn and better connected for future job potential.

CONS:

Cost.  Prestigious eMBAs are among the most expensive degrees in the world, dollar for dollar.  Although price decreases with prestige, so does the quality of the network.

Generalist degree.  With few specialty eMBAs outside of health care, the degree is not good for targeted learning, nor is it particularly well suited for career shifting.

Brutal time constraints.  With 34+ hours per week devoted to classes, plus work, plus family, you will be overwhelmed.  Don't do this at just any time in your life.

Lifelong alumni ties.  By earning your degree a few years later, you lose that much time to forge long-term connections with your classmates.

CONCLUSION:

In the final analysis, the eMBA is undoubtedly going to face a more challenging road ahead with cheaper access to online MBAs, distance learning and self-instruction and certificates.  But it still makes sense for certain groups of people, particularly middle management looking for a pay or title bump (with company support) and internationally focused business professionals looking to grow their networks.

Struggling with your application to a top eMBA program?  Contact us for help.


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The 2014-2015 deadlines have all been gathered in one convenient location -- on our website.

By Ben Feuer



Poets and Quants has posted all of the 2014-2015 deadlines for the top schools, and we added them to our MBA essay guide.  Now you can find all the questions and all the deadlines in one super convenient location!  You're welcome.

We do have a couple of very important caveats we would like to add to this joyous occasion.  The biggest change, and the most challenging deadline to meet this year is Kellogg's.  Although it is ALWAYS preferable to do an on-campus interview if possible, some students may need to request an off-campus interview for Kellogg.  Kellogg has made it clear that there are a very limited number of slots for off-campus interviews this year, and they are going to fill up quickly -- so if you are interested in Kellogg, you should try to have your application in by September 3rd, September 10th at the absolute latest.  If you are planning to do an on-campus interview, you can take another week or so, but be aware that slots for on-campus interviewing are limited as well.

Columbia GSB continues to have rolling admissions, making the early decision the odds-on favorite for acceptance to the program (our data from our own candidates bears this out).  If you are not planning to apply early decision, however, wait until after the early decision period is ended to submit your application.  This caveat does not apply to early decision schools without rolling admissions.

Otherwise, just be aware (if you are not already) that all the deadlines have moved up.  You will need to submit earlier in the year, so get started now -- don't wait!


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By Ben Feuer

Wharton, like most schools, has trimmed its essay offerings this year.  They are down to just one, and it is a variation on the time-honored goals essay.  Some things about Wharton from previous application years still apply in this one, though -- campus visits can still be a difference maker, as can any demonstrated interest in the target school.  Wharton wants to know why if selected, you will attend.

Required Essay Questions:

  1. What do you hope to gain both personally and professionally from the Wharton MBA? (500 words)

This is a lot to cover in just 500 words.  First and foremost, in order to properly answer this question you must identify what your professional goals are, and the way to do that is by starting off with a goals essay.  Write (briefly) about your short (immediately after business school) and long (~5 years after graduation) goals, but do not get bogged down in the details, and do not waste a lot of space talking about why you are a super qualified to attend, or all the awesome leadership experience you have had, or any of that -- Wharton didn't ask for it.  Instead, the second half (or more than half) of the essay should be focused on Why Wharton is the ideal fit for you.  Do research and campus visits, reach out to alumni and current students, whatever it takes to get interesting information about Wharton -- then tie those tidbits to your goals and ambitions.  And don't forget while you are doing this that Wharton asked about your personal goals as well -- don't shortchange those.  Talk about friends, family, and any social benefits you expect from your two years at Wharton.

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